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Zen of Python

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Guiding principles for Python design were gathered by Tim Peters; They are in fact a set of rules, that every single Pythonista should know by heart and follow them in order to write better code. In reality, following those rules is beneficial to programmers of every language. They have been gathered as PEP20

As an easter egg, they can be listed from Python's REPL:

>>> import this;

The Zen of Python, by Tim Peters

Beautiful is better than ugly.

Explicit is better than implicit.

Simple is better than complex.

Complex is better than complicated.

Flat is better than nested.

Sparse is better than dense.

Readability counts.

Special cases aren't special enough to break the rules.

Although practicality beats purity.

Errors should never pass silently.

Unless explicitly silenced.

In the face of ambiguity, refuse the temptation to guess.

There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it.

Although that way may not be obvious at first unless you're Dutch.

Now is better than never.

Although never is often better than *right* now.

If the implementation is hard to explain, it's a bad idea.

If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea.

Namespaces are one honking great idea -- let's do more of those!

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